Fate and Ethics in “A Thousand Pieces of You”

A Thousand Pieces of You by Claudia Gray was a fast-paced book perfect for lovers of both sci-fi and historical fiction, which means it was perfect for me. While it maintains an air of general predictability throughout, there is enough originality and creativity in the setting(s) that I would definitely recommend it.

Claudia Gray is an excellent writer. She makes it so easy to just fall into her stories and to stay there until the very last word. I really enjoyed this book. And while I don’t think it is her best work, or most creative, it is well done, and very very fun.

The premise is this: Marguerite Caine is the daughter of two brilliant scientists who have discovered not only the existence of other dimensions, but also the technology needed to visit these alternate universes. When Marguerite’s father is murdered, and the suspected murderer flees into another dimension, she follows suit in order to find and kill him.

The downfall of this book really is its predictability. By the first chapter I had the general plot pretty much figured out. It did throw in a few fun surprises at the end but nothing too game-changing.

Despite all that, I am planning to read the two sequels in the coming weeks. The characters were appealing, and the science-y adventures were too much fun. I’m still amazed that I just read a book that contained cool futuristic technology and a beautiful historical romance.

The romance was definitely one of the highlights of this book. I am a sucker for a good romance line, and this was a good one.

Gray also brought up some excellent ethical questions about the main character’s actions in other dimensions, and the morality of taking advantage of experiences that should have been taken by someone else.

This book also contains themes of fate and destiny, and whether a person is made up of experiences. Whether a soul can be significantly changed by experiences or if they will be the same person regardless of any changes made to their previous experiences.

It is these kinds of themes and ethical questions that makes this book stand out from other YA fiction. They add depth to the story and help readers learn to think about the story on a deeper level.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book, and would recommend it. (4/5)

Advertisements

I’m in love with Roshani Chokshi’s “A Crown of Wishes”

Almost immediately after I finished The Star-Crossed Queen, I picked up Roshani Chokshi’s sequel A Crown of Wishes and was not disappointed. If anything, I liked it even more than its predecessor. That’s not something I get to say very often.

Starring Maya’s sister, Gauri, this book focused more on how people change through sacrifice, experience, and how life is not necessarily about getting everything you want, but about the stories you make and leave behind.

This book had beautiful characters that changed and developed naturally, but dramatically, from beginning to end. I love a good character-driven story, and this one is a good one.

The romance too was wonderful. Gradual, slowly realized, and full of exquisite wanting and waiting, Chokshi masterfully created a believable and enviable relationship that will keep you on the edge of your seat and a smile on your lips.

Overall, this book left me wanting more in the best possible way. I can’t wait to read whatever Chokshi comes out with next! 5/5

Desire and Indian Folklore in “A Star-Touched Queen”

Roshana Chokshi’s A Star-Touched Queen was a New York Times bestseller for good reason. Steeped in Indian folklore and myth, Chokshi’s YA fantasy novel brings a world of romance, heartbreak, intrigue, and untold secrets to life.

Maya, a princess who has been told from birth that she was cursed to bring death and destruction to those around her, knows she will probably never marry. However, her father’s desire to bring hasty end to a years-old war sets her up to marry a man who not only seems to love her, but who draws out parts of her she didn’t realize she had. As she sets out to untangle her new husband’s mysteries and the mysteries of the seemingly empty kingdom over which he rules, she discovers her own immense power, desire, and a past she didn’t know she had.

Told with vibrant descriptions, I fell in love with the world and the characters almost immediately. The characters drew me into their lives, their dreams, and their desires. I found myself passionately involved in relationships and outcomes of even the smallest characters. Maya in particular, really kept me invested. Her struggle to know who she is, in and out of a relationship is very relatable. It can be so difficult to know where you stop and your partner begins and vice versa, and the fear of losing yourself can be very real.

I loved this story of love, desire, and trust, and would not only recommend it, but I would urge you to read the sequel too. It was AWESOME!